Is malanga good for dogs? Malanga root.

If you feel your dog has eaten a portion of a malanga, you should take him to a veterinarian immediately, even if he is not showing any signs of illness. It is caused by ingesting the malanga plant, which contains insoluble calcium oxalate crystals, and may range from mild to severe…. Vet costs might creep up on you without you realizing it.

is malanga good for dogs
is malanga good for dogs

What is Malanga Poisoning and how does it happen?

In its home area of Africa, the malanga may reach heights of up to eight feet and a width of around five feet. However, in the United States, they are unable to thrive in any of the states where they are cultivated outdoors, despite the fact that the malanga may make an excellent interior plant. It is recommended that those who have dogs keep the malanga out of their reach at all times since canines have a tendency to gnaw on plants. If you feel your dog has eaten a portion of a malanga, you should take him to a veterinarian immediately, even if he is not showing any signs of illness.

It is caused by ingesting the malanga plant, which contains insoluble calcium oxalate crystals, and may range in severity from mild to life-threatening. When you bite into or chew on a malanga plant, you will experience acute pain and burning in your mouth when the crystals (which are arranged in bundles called raphides) penetrate the soft tissue. It is possible that your dog may vomit, become unable to swallow, and possibly have difficulty breathing as a result of the inflammation. In fact, while it is uncommon, some dogs suffer from severe edema to the point where they are unable to breathe at all. The presence of oxalic acid in the plant also has the additional effect of decreasing the availability of calcium, protein, and other nutrients. Another toxin found in the malanga plant is asparagine, which has been linked to numerous types of cancer and has been shown to have negative effects on the kidneys.

Malanga Poisoning in Dogs: What to Look For
Malanga Poisoning in Dogs: What to Look For

Malanga Poisoning in Dogs: What to Look For

The first indicators that your pet has eaten a portion of a malanga plant are often yelping or whimpering, as well as pawing at the mouth or tongue. As a result of the instant discomfort that is induced by the oxalate crystals, this is the case. The following are the most prevalent symptoms of malanga poisoning:

  • A lack of desire to eat
  • Using your hands to rub your face and mouth
  • Irritation of the mouth
  • Exposed skin, eyes, and mouth experience intense burning.
  • Lips, tongue, and mouth become flushed and swollen as a result of the illness.
  • Drooling in an unusually large quantity
  • Vomiting
  • Having trouble swallowing
  • Inflammation of the throat and airway that causes difficulty breathing.
  • Variations in the rate of heartbeat (too slow or too fast)

Types

Malanga is scientifically known as Colocasia esculenta, and it is a member of the Araceae family. However, it is also known by a variety of other names, including

Elephant ear plant (Alocasia caladium), often known as elephant ear plant

Taro plant (also known as taro root)

Is cooked Malanga safe for dogs to consume?

If you feel your dog has eaten a portion of a malanga, you should take him to a veterinarian immediately, even if he is not showing any signs of illness. It is caused by ingesting the malanga plant, which contains insoluble calcium oxalate crystals, and may range in severity from mild to life-threatening.

Malanga Poisoning in Dogs: What Causes It?
Malanga Poisoning in Dogs: What Causes It?

Malanga Poisoning in Dogs: What Causes It?

Asparagine – This amino acid has the potential to induce cancer of the kidneys and ovaries.

Insoluble calcium oxalates – Causes discomfort and swelling as a result of the bundles of oxalate crystals that get entrenched in the soft tissues as a result of their insoluble nature.

Obtained from oxalic acid, which binds calcium and other minerals, producing a reduction in the minerals required for normal development.

Malanga Poisoning in Dogs: Diagnosis and Treatment
Malanga Poisoning in Dogs: Diagnosis and Treatment

Malanga Poisoning in Dogs: Diagnosis and Treatment

If you can bring a sample of the plant or a photograph of it to the veterinarian, the diagnosis of malanga poisoning will be much easy. Additionally, provide all of the information you have about the plant your pet ate, including how much was ingested and when it was consumed. Giving your veterinarian a copy of your pet’s medical and immunization records will also assist her in treatment planning. Also, be sure to inform her if your dog is taking any medications. In addition to checking your pet’s weight, body temperature, reflexes, blood pressure, heart rate, breath sounds, and pulse oximetry, a comprehensive physical examination will be conducted to determine your pet’s overall health (oxygen saturation level).

An increased quantity of protein and calcium will be seen in the urine of your dog if he is suffering from malanga poisoning, as shown by a urinalysis. In addition, the veterinarian will do a complete blood count and chemical profile to determine if the patient’s creatinine, salt, and chloride levels are greater than usual. If there are any plant particles in the upper digestive tract, the veterinarian will most likely do an endoscopy to determine the cause. In order to evaluate if there are any obstructions created by the inflammation induced by the oxalate crystals, abdominal x-rays are taken. In the intestinal tract, stomach, and other parts of the digestive system, these crystals may get entrenched, causing severe irritation and perhaps blockage. The size and health of the kidneys, stomach, and liver will also be assessed using ultrasound technology throughout the procedure. An MRI or CT scan may be recommended by the veterinarian in order to get a more thorough look at the animal.

Evacuation

To induce vomiting, a peroxide solution or ipecac will be administered, and activated charcoal will be administered to absorb any undigested toxins. This procedure may be performed as many times as required.

Detoxification

In order to detoxify your pet, the veterinarian will perform a warm water lavage to flush out any plant materials or residue that may have remained in the digestive tract after surgery. Following that, fluids will be given to your dog via an intravenous (IV) line in order to flush the kidneys and avoid dehydration.

Medication

Some patients will have their IV fluids supplemented with calcium chloride or calcium gluconate to aid in the binding and removal of calcium oxalates from their blood. It is likely that a stomach protectant will be prescribed, as well as corticosteroids, to help minimize the swelling and inflammation.

Observation

If your dog has ingested a substantial quantity of malanga, your veterinarian may recommend that you take him to the hospital for observation for the night.

Dogs with Malanga Poisoning are able to recover.

Once you’ve returned home, continue to keep a close eye on your dog for any strange behavior or changes in appetite. If you have any queries or worries regarding his appetite or recuperation pace, you should contact your veterinarian as soon as possible. During this time, your veterinarian will be able to recommend meals that will be acceptable and appetizing for your pet to consume while his mouth heals and returns to normal.

Malanga is a root vegetable that is often found in South America, Africa, and other tropical countries. It is also available in some Asian markets. It has a texture that is comparable to that of potatoes, and it is often processed into flour that may be used in the kitchen. The malanga plant, in contrast to potatoes, is not a member of the nightshade family, which is a group of foods that certain individuals are required to avoid due to medical reasons. Malanga is a more nutrient-dense alternative to potatoes since it has more fiber.

Malanga root.
Malanga root.

Malanga root.

Aside from that, malanga is identical to taro, another root vegetable. They are not interchangeable, despite the fact that some businesses offer them under the same name as each other. Although they are members of the same family (Arceae), they are classified into distinct genus groupings. Malanga has a hairy feel to its skin and is shaped like a longer, thinner potato, which gives it its name. Taro has a brighter skin tone than malanga and is more bulb-shaped than the latter fruit.

Q&A Is malanga good for dogs?
Q&A Is malanga good for dogs?

Q&A Is malanga good for dogs?

My dog ate a few pieces of malanga, which he’s never eaten before. So I looked it up on google & it stated it’s poisoning to dogs. My dog weighs 18lbs. What should I do?

Veterinarian’s Assistant: I’ll do all I can to help. Has the dog vomited since he ate the pieces?

No he just ate them, no symptoms

Veterinarian’s Assistant: Is there anything else the Vet should know?

He ate about 3 small pcs

F.A.Q

Is malanga a plant that cats can eat?

Protect your cat by bringing him to a veterinarian as soon as you see indications of taro poisoning so that he may get treatment as soon as possible. The taro plant, which is also known as caladium, elephant’s ears, and malanga, is distinguished by its enormous, lush green leaves that are typically tinged with a vibrant pink hue in the center. Taro is a staple crop in many parts of the world.

Is it safe for dogs to consume taro root?

In order to protect your dog from toxicosis and gastrointestinal tract irritation, as well as the possibility of kidney injury or renal failure caused by the calcium oxalates found in taro root, you should keep the root away from him at all times, raw or cooked.

Is it true that seeds are harmful to dogs?

Shelled sunflower seeds, chia seeds, and flaxseed are all good choices for your pet’s nutritional needs. Many seeds, on the other hand, should only be ingested in moderation or not at all. Nuts, shells, and apple seeds may all pose a threat to your dog’s health, and the pits of avocados, cherries, and other fruits can be hazardous to them as well.

Conslusion

If you feel your dog has eaten a portion of a malanga, you should take him to a veterinarian immediately, even if he is not showing any signs of illness. It is caused by ingesting the malanga plant, which contains insoluble calcium oxalate crystals, and may range in severity from mild to life-threatening.

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