The lessons to be learned by the Ancients by perry estelle

The First Ancient Ancestors Of Our Planet
By Perry Estelle, June 18th, 2013 8:13 am
First Natives
You may be startled to learn that there are less than 4% of the global population are indigenous or descended from the first ancient ancestors of our planet.
The North American Native Indian represents a minute fraction of that.
Before the White settlers arrived in the mid 1600’s excess of one million tribes people lived amongst more than 100 other communities spanning every present state of the Americas. From the Blackfoot and Piegans of the Northwest across to the Great Basin, home of the Arapaho and travelling East to the High Plains of Montana, through North and South Dakota to meet Cheyenne Apache Comanche. Further South the Lipan and Mescalero Apache, Chiricahua Navaho. In the South East in the states of Alabama and Georgia the Choctaw and Chickasaw raised their braves to become huntsman and craftsmen. Customs remained for centuries until our day.
The different cultures were, vibrant and not the same ‘Red Indian’ over this last century depicted by TV and movies as a cut throat savage, scalp slashing invader! Sure, some tribes were more territorial and warlike than others but generally they had been left for thousands of years to farm, hunt and weave in comparative harmony within a vast continent. They had a relationship with their land of great respect and were noble in their general world view. They were humbled by the land and the spirits would only protect them if they honoured their environment. They lived as part of a tight-knit community as mainly hunters farmers and weavers.
Over years of dislocation the original North American tribes people, like the Buffalo they once depended on to sustain their own existence, became threatened by the invading ‘paleface’. Only recently in history have these families been ‘allowed’ to dwell in the homelands of their forefathers again.
The Native people first lived in conical skin tents. When they travelled or moved their camps they would use the largest dogs to haul their tents. The long poles were fastened to the dogs’ saddles and dragged. The construction was called a ‘travois’ and it was light and easy to transport. During the first part of the 17th century horses brought from Mexico were introduced to the Native people by the Spanish explorers. The introduction of the horse made hauling the tipi and camp a much easier task.
The Indians hunted the buffalo, and the hides were used to make the tipi. The tendons of the buffalo served as sewing kits for the yarn. The bones and horns were used for making tools, scrapers and needles. The brains, which contained tannic acid, were kept for tanning the dried hides. The hide was usually kept white to keep the inside of the tipi light and comfortable, then fresh conifer branches were burned inside the tipi for 24 hours, the resin in the smoke making the tipi waterproof. The Indian Tipi was in perfect harmony with nature.
The tipi forms a tilted cone. The short length of the cone is tilted at the back to provide protection against the wind and to allow more head room at the back of the tipi. The opening of the tipi faced east, as the wind commonly blew from the west of the plains. The fireplace was built nearer to the door to create room in the rear of the tipi.
We have found over recent years that more and more green thinking individuals, young and old yearn for the Tipi experience. It grows in popularity because a nourished unique human consciousness.  Probably because when folks see a Tipi they conjure up in their mind a mystical romantic ideal associated with exciting legend. They are very visual. Everybody loves them. They appeal to all ages.
These days the whole holiday industry is changing because of environmental issues. We take the view that peoples attitude towards a more eco-friendly leisure pursuit is evolving in a positive way.
Tipi Heaven
Folks as a whole have gravitated towards a leisure lifestyle that works in harmony with the environment to reduce carbon footprints.
Our generation appears more adaptable to low impact leisure and have taken some sensible lessons from our ancient predecessors.
Not wasting resources. ‘Glam camping’ is putting polluting airlines out of business! Fact.
Tipis and The Native North American way nourish this new-age thinking because people who love holidaying and the Great Outdoors reflect on such environmental issues. More and more people today respect the mindset of the first indigenous tribes. The Native North Americans and how they lived their Nomadic lives in tune with nature and cared for, even worshipped their homeland. They even named themselves after the wildlife of their land. They were the first environmentalists. Our very ancestors.  Our children are even more aware of their environmental responsibilities.
Here is a lodger comment:
“I found the whole experience the weirdest of fun. Stoking and cooking on a logfire in a tent was about as primitive as it gets for a social carer! But it was such a fab thing for the kids and quite comfortable. Had some very memorable moments that I will keep forever. I’d do it again tomorrow… whatever the weather”
Tipis are great for Birthdays, Anniversaries, Weddings, Sleepovers, Club and School events or if you need to extend the accommodation for your guests and available for a single night, weekend or longer. We even offer a ‘Birthing Tipi’ for the most important and unique of all occasions!
All Tipis hired are delivered, pitched and dismantled by us at your chosen location.
We can travel to you anywhere in the world and put tipis up for you and give you a great deal on 3 or more Tipis! Just give us a call.
Visit http://www.Tipi-Heaven.co.uk

The First Ancient Ancestors Of Our Planet By Perry Estelle, May 15, 2011 8:13 pm First NativesYou may be startled to learn that there are less than 4% of the global population are indigenous or descended from the first ancient ancestors of our planet. The North American Native Indian represents a minute fraction of that.Before the White settlers arrived in the mid 1600’s excess of one million tribes people lived amongst more than 100 other communities spanning every present state of the Americas. From the Blackfoot and Piegans of the Northwest across to the Great Basin, home of the Arapaho and travelling East to the High Plains of Montana, through North and South Dakota to meet Cheyenne Apache Comanche. Further South the Lipan and Mescalero Apache, Chiricahua Navaho. In the South East in the states of Alabama and Georgia the Choctaw and Chickasaw raised their braves to become huntsman and craftsmen. Customs remained for centuries until our day.The different cultures were, vibrant and not the same ‘Red Indian’ over this last century depicted by TV and movies as a cut throat savage, scalp slashing invader! Sure, some tribes were more territorial and warlike than others but generally they had been left for thousands of years to farm, hunt and weave in comparative harmony within a vast continent. They had a relationship with their land of great respect and were noble in their general world view. They were humbled by the land and the spirits would only protect them if they honoured their environment. They lived as part of a tight-knit community as mainly hunters farmers and weavers.Over years of dislocation the original North American tribes people, like the Buffalo they once depended on to sustain their own existence, became threatened by the invading ‘paleface’. Only recently in history have these families been ‘allowed’ to dwell in the homelands of their forefathers again.
The Native people first lived in conical skin tents. When they travelled or moved their camps they would use the largest dogs to haul their tents. The long poles were fastened to the dogs’ saddles and dragged. The construction was called a ‘travois’ and it was light and easy to transport. During the first part of the 17th century horses brought from Mexico were introduced to the Native people by the Spanish explorers. The introduction of the horse made hauling the tipi and camp a much easier task.The Indians hunted the buffalo, and the hides were used to make the tipi. The tendons of the buffalo served as sewing kits for the yarn. The bones and horns were used for making tools, scrapers and needles. The brains, which contained tannic acid, were kept for tanning the dried hides. The hide was usually kept white to keep the inside of the tipi light and comfortable, then fresh conifer branches were burned inside the tipi for 24 hours, the resin in the smoke making the tipi waterproof. The Indian Tipi was in perfect harmony with nature.The tipi forms a tilted cone. The short length of the cone is tilted at the back to provide protection against the wind and to allow more head room at the back of the tipi. The opening of the tipi faced east, as the wind commonly blew from the west of the plains. The fireplace was built nearer to the door to create room in the rear of the tipi.We have found over recent years that more and more green thinking individuals, young and old yearn for the Tipi experience. It grows in popularity because a nourished unique human consciousness.  Probably because when folks see a Tipi they conjure up in their mind a mystical romantic ideal associated with exciting legend. They are very visual. Everybody loves them. They appeal to all ages.
These days the whole holiday industry is changing because of environmental issues. We take the view that peoples attitude towards a more eco-friendly leisure pursuit is evolving in a positive way. Tipi HeavenFolks as a whole have gravitated towards a leisure lifestyle that works in harmony with the environment to reduce carbon footprints.Our generation appears more adaptable to low impact leisure and have taken some sensible lessons from our ancient predecessors.Not wasting resources. ‘Glam camping’ is putting polluting airlines out of business! Fact.Tipis and The Native North American way nourish this new-age thinking because people who love holidaying and the Great Outdoors reflect on such environmental issues. More and more people today respect the mindset of the first indigenous tribes. The Native North Americans and how they lived their Nomadic lives in tune with nature and cared for, even worshipped their homeland. They even named themselves after the wildlife of their land. They were the first environmentalists. Our very ancestors.  Our children are even more aware of their environmental responsibilities.Here is a lodger comment:“I found the whole experience the weirdest of fun. Stoking and cooking on a logfire in a tent was about as primitive as it gets for a social carer! But it was such a fab thing for the kids and quite comfortable. Had some very memorable moments that I will keep forever. I’d do it again tomorrow… whatever the weather”Tipis are great for Birthdays, Anniversaries, Weddings, Sleepovers, Club and School events or if you need to extend the accommodation for your guests and available for a single night, weekend or longer. We even offer a ‘Birthing Tipi’ for the most important and unique of all occasions!All Tipis hired are delivered, pitched and dismantled by us at your chosen location.We can travel to you anywhere in the world and put tipis up for you and give you a great deal on 3 or more Tipis! Just give us a call.Visit http://www.Tipi-Heaven.co.uk

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